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Hercules: Hercules has a mainstream American accent, once again.  Had Disney wanted to be a little more accurate to the setting, Hercules would have a Greek accent, but that would then make the audience lose the vocal connection they have with him.

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Hercules:  In this film, the villain, Hades, has an American accent; however, instead of having a mainstream American accent, has a Brooklyn accent, and is often described as having a “car dealer” matter of speaking: fast-talking, but very smooth.  Though different from the typical droning Disney villain voice, his voice is still unsettling.  And he yells a lot.  That’s strange too.

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Pocahontas: Governor Ratcliffe has a British accent more exaggerated than any of his crew members, and has a low, droning voice like most of the other villains we’ve seen before.

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Pocahontas: Pocahontas has a mainstream American voice (despite just recently learning English!) that sounds very assertive and confident.

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The Lion King:  Young Simba has a mainstream American accent.  Big surprise?

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The Lion King: (go to 3:15) Adult Simba (as distinguished from Young Simba, who was played by a different voice actor) also has a mainstream American accent.

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The Lion King: Scar has a Disney villain voice: A low, droning voice with a British accent.  From the very beginning of the film, his voice just screams villain.

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One Hundred and One Dalmatians: (My apologies for having to make you go to the YouTube site, but it’s one of the few videos that contains any part from the movie, or in this case, the whole movie.) Before this, most of our protagonists have had mainstream American accents, but since this film takes place in London, and Disney makes a decent effort to try to make the film’s characters represent the setting, everyone has a British accent.  Despite this, both Pongo and Perdita, the film’s four-legged protagonists, have very soft, natural voices, in stark contrast with Cruella.

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One Hundred and One Dalmatians: Cruella De Vil has an obnoxious, overly-exaggerated British accent complete with words like “dahhhhhling,” and is very loud and harsh compared to everyone else (you almost have to turn down your speakers when she starts talking).

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The Princess and the Frog: This film takes place in 1926 New Orleans, so everyone has an accent to reflect the setting, much like One Hundred and One Dalmatians.  Tiana’s voice is no exception, but to distinguish it from others in the film, she has a very soft, sweet voice that seems to flow very smoothly when she talks.

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